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Harry Cassin Publisher and Editor

Andy Spalding Senior Editor

Jessica Tillipman Senior Editor

Richard L. Cassin Editor at Large

Elizabeth K. Spahn Editor Emeritus 

Cody Worthington Contributing Editor

Julie DiMauro Contributing Editor

Thomas Fox Contributing Editor

Marc Alain Bohn Contributing Editor

Bill Waite Contributing Editor

Shruti J. Shah Contributing Editor

Russell A. Stamets Contributing Editor

Richard Bistrong Contributing Editor 

Eric Carlson Contributing Editor

Bill Steinman Contributing Editor

Aarti Maharaj Contributing Editor


FCPA Blog Daily News

Entries in Lockheed (14)

Monday
Feb042019

Job: Senior General Attorney

Job Title: Senior General Attorney

Employer: Lockheed Martin Corporation

Location: Fort Worth, Texas USA

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jun122017

Arms dealer who helped inspire FCPA dies in London

Adnan Khashoggi, the Saudi arms dealer in the middle of the giant 1970s bribery scandal that led to enactment of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, has died in London at 81.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Dec202016

SEC says NeuStar tried to impede whistleblowing

The Securities and Exchange Commission fined a Virginia-based technology company $180,000 Monday for using severance agreements that impeded former employees from communicating information to the SEC.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Oct302014

In defense of the Caldwell Doctrine (in reply)

Yesterday's post on Leslie Caldwell's vision of the FCPA elicited a number of comments. And I do love a good back-and-forth.

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Wednesday
Oct312012

Ranking the defense industry’s anti-corruption policies and systems

A few weeks ago, Transparency International UK’s (“TI-UK”) International Defence and Security Programme published the 2012 “Defence Companies Anti-Corruption Index.”

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Oct172012

From Lockheed to Lance: how falls from grace can change the world

Doping in sport, like graft in business, skews the rules of the game.

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Tuesday
May292012

Wal-Mart's Simple Lesson: Learn To Live With The FCPA

There's a reason why you don't see many of the biggest U.S.-based government contractors on the FCPA top ten list (e.g., Lockheed, General Dynamics, Raytheon, Northrup, Boeing, etc.).

Click to read more ...

Friday
Feb102012

Dutch Won't Open Old Lockheed Wound 

The leader of the Dutch government has refused to open a new investigation into the role played by Prince Bernhard in the Lockheed scandal that broke in 1976.

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Sunday
Nov012009

The FCPA's Thwarted Intent

The first time we heard from Andy Spalding (left), a lawyer on a year-long Fulbright Research Grant in Mumbai, India, he floored us with the idea that the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act causes corruption and hurts poor people. We just heard from him again, this time about the way the Justice Department explains the purpose of the FCPA and approaches enforcement. We'll let Andy speak for himself (because he does it so well). Here's what he said:

Dear FCPA Blog,

 

I was recently reading the DOJ's "Lay-Person's Guide to the FCPA," available here, which provides a helpful overview of the FCPA, including a brief reference to its legislative history. I am generally grateful for any effort on Justice's part to make the statute transparent and user-friendly; the more that can be done in that area, the better. But I must take issue with Justice's brief but telling account of the statute's legislative history, particularly the political events of the 1970s that precipitated the bill's enactment. The guide is telling, not for what it says, but for what it does not say -- that is, for what the DOJ has seemingly forgotten. And as Edmund Burke famously warned, "those who don't know history are destined to repeat it."

The guide refers to the SEC report, well known to your readers, which disclosed that hundreds of companies had engaged in overseas bribery. The guide further implies that recognition of the need for anti-bribery legislation occurred mainly in response to this report. But the report was not released until mid-1976, and Congress had begun deliberating on the need for anti-bribery legislation as early as August of 1975. What, then, was Congress talking about in 1975, if not the SEC report?

Look to the transcripts of the earliest testimony. Congress was concerned with the conduct of one company in particular -- Lockheed -- which was publicly known at the time to have bribed officials from several overseas governments, particularly Japan, the Netherlands, and Italy. Scandals erupted in these countries, and public officials were shamed or forced to resign as a result. That much remains in our memory, but we forget the rest of the story. Particular attention was paid in congressional testimony to Italy, whose parliament at the time was divided roughly in half between the democrats and, yes, the communists.

Witnesses and congressmen alike, from both sides of the political aisle, expressed concern that revelations of bribery would confirm the stereotype of the corrupt capitalist that was widely promoted in communist propaganda. This, in turn, would weaken our political ties to unstable countries, and open the door to further influence from countries that we believed were hostile to the values of a liberal democratic society. The FCPA, then, was designed not only to promote business ethics, but to serve as an instrument of foreign policy. Ample support for this account in the legislative history may be found at your post here.

Although the Cold War is over, the FCPA nonetheless operates today in an international political context that is only slightly less delicate than in the 1970s. As Congressman Stephen Solarz (D-NY) stated in 1976, "it is important to examine the problem of overseas payments in broader terms than simply a matter of economics or even morality." I would ask, does the DOJ heed the congressman's warning today? Does it consider the impact of FCPA enforcement on delicate international political relationships? I see absolutely no evidence that it does. Indeed, I would politely throw down the gauntlet and challenge anyone to provide an account of Justice's foreign policy vision of FCPA enforcement that requires more than just a couple sentences to articulate.

Many thanks,
Andy Spalding

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Tuesday
Sep222009

The Fugitive Files, Part III

When Suleiman A. Nassar was indicted in 1994 for violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, he was a regional vice president of Lockheed International living near Geneva, Switzerland. His territory for Lockheed included Egypt, and in the late 1980s he landed a nice sale there -- three C-130 military cargo planes worth $79 million. But he won the business, the Justice Department said, by bribing a member of the Egyptian parliament with a million dollars. The DOJ indicted him, along with a co-worker and Lockheed itself.

Before issuing the indictment, the Justice Department spoke with Nassar, a Syrian-born, naturalized U.S. citizen. He assured prosecutors he would appear voluntarily in Atlanta, where the case would be filed. They in turn agreed not to have him arrested in Europe, which would have triggered a long extradition process. It was a gentlemanly arrangement but Nassar had other intentions. He never showed up in Atlanta and instead did his best to vanish.

He fled to his birthplace, Syria, a country with no extradition treaty or law-enforcement agreements with the U.S. Prosecutors said later they were "disappointed and frustrated" by Nassar's escape. But they didn't give up.

They tracked him to Damascus after Swiss police noticed that his wife was receiving mail from an address there. But how to get him back? As the prosecutors said, the relationship between America and Syria was, at best, "notoriously tenuous."

One thing the Justice Department could do was make his life difficult. When he sold two condos in Washington, D.C., prosecutors used the Federal Debt Collection Procedures Act ( 28 U.S.C. § 3001, et seq.) to block the international transfer of the sale proceeds. Then they used the ancient All Writs Act (28 U.S.C. § 1651)* to freeze Nassar’s worldwide assets -- including pension payments that eventually amounted to about $750,000. Prosecutors even threatened to freeze an inheritance his wife was about to receive, on the grounds that she might use the money to help her husband evade arrest.

The Syrians, meanwhile, did their part too. They arrested Nassar in late September 1994 under an Interpol warrant circulated by the U.S. They held him in jail until he made bail two months later. Once released, he stayed in Damascus -- the local police had impounded his passport -- and nothing further happened. The Americans couldn't extradite him, the Syrians wouldn't keep him locked up, and everyone assumed the case was stuck. But they were wrong.

In January 1995, Lockheed pleaded guilty to violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. That generated global headlines, leading the Syrian government to take a new interest in their now-notorious FCPA fugitive. In March 1995, DOJ prosecutors were meeting with the Syrian justice minister. He chose that moment to deliver some dramatic news: Nassar had just been arrested "on charges of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and that under the doctrine of extraterritoriality, the Syrian Government intended to try him in Damascus." As U.S. prosecutors said later, it wasn't exactly the trial they had in mind.

But by then Nassar was exhausted and scared. The global freeze on his family's assets, two arrests, a looming Syrian criminal trial, the prospect of years in a local prison -- he'd had enough. According to the DOJ's account, in July 1995 their man was "released from Adra Prison in Syria and escorted to the Damascus Airport where he boarded a plane for Frankfurt, Germany. There he was met by Special Agent Chris Amato of the Defense Criminal Investigation Service, taken to Atlanta, and placed under arrest."

Nassar agreed to plead guilty to violating the FCPA. By prior arrangement, he was sentenced to 18 months in prison and fined $125,000, to be paid from his frozen funds before they were released. His co-worker Allen Love pleaded guilty to lying to investigators and was fined $20,000. Lockheed's guilty plea to conspiracy to violate the FCPA's antibribery provisions resulted in penalties of $24.8 million.

A final note: Suleiman A. Nassar -- who almost became the first person to be tried outside the United States for violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act -- was the first person ever imprisoned in the U.S. for an FCPA offense.

* * *
This post is adapted in part from an article called "The International Fugitive," by Martin J. Weinstein and Daniel A. Caldwell of the U.S. Attorneys' Office for the Northern District of Georgia. The article appeared in the USA Bulletin for December 1996, Volume 44, Number 6, which can be downloaded here.

Parts I and II of the Fugitive Files can be found here and here.

We're grateful to Cody Worthington, whose outstanding research was the basis for our series on FCPA fugitives.
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*The All Writs Act (28 U.S.C. § 1651) provides: (a) The Supreme Court and all courts established by Act of Congress may issue all writs necessary or appropriate in aid of their respective jurisdictions and agreeable to the usages and principles of law. (b) An alternative writ or rule nisi may be issued by a justice or judge of a court which has jurisdiction.
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Tuesday
Jun162009

All Good For Sun?

In May, a month after it agreed to be acquired by Oracle for $7.4 billion, Sun Microsystems said it may have violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and that the violations could have a material effect on its business. It launched an internal investigation and shared the results with the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission. See our post here.

Now it looks like it was all a false alarm. Sun's latest SEC filing, a Definitive Merger Proxy dated June 8, 2009 (Schedule 14A), says this:

Section 4.13. Compliance with Applicable Law.

(a) The Company and each of its Subsidiaries is and, since June 30, 2006 has been, in compliance in all material respects with all Applicable Laws and Orders. Neither the Company nor any of its Subsidiaries has received any written notice since June 30, 2006 (i) of any administrative, civil or criminal investigation or audit by any Governmental Authority relating to the Company or any of its Subsidiaries or (ii) from any Governmental Authority alleging that the Company or any of its Subsidiaries are not in compliance with any Applicable Law or Order in any material respect.

And a little later in the merger document, Sun represents to Oracle that without exception it has "complied with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 and other applicable anti-corruption laws." (see Section 4.24)

So, no FCPA violations and no notice from the DOJ or SEC of any investigations. A clean slate.

Not many internal FCPA investigations end this way. More often -- usually, in fact -- they start because of apparently reliable signs of compliance trouble. Most investigations then end up confirming that yes, violations occurred -- usually beyond the scope of initial concerns. Sun's outcome, therefore, isn't typical.

What happened here? Sun isn't saying. But the timing may not have been accidental. Did anonymous whistleblowers opposed to Oracle's acquisition file false complaints? It's happened before. Did people upset about potential disturbances in Sun's pivotal and hallowed role in the open-source community try to torpedo the deal by tossing false allegations into the mix? Twisted, but possible.

Wherever the allegations came from, Sun made all the right moves. It responded fast with a proper internal investigation, self-reports to the feds, and full disclosure to the marketplace. After all that, it came up with nothing. Compliance program and corporate integrity intact. Great result. Time to move on.

Before we all scatter, though, one last question.

Could Sun's statements in its merger proxy be wrong? Just boilerplate reps saving the place in the text? Might Sun still have FCPA problems it isn't disclosing just yet? Not likely, considering the Lockheed Martin / Titan case.

Those companies planned to merge in 2003. During due diligence, Titan was found to have serious FCPA compliance issues. Before Lockheed Martin terminated the merger, Titan had already filed an 8-K disclosure document with the SEC that included a proxy form with the merger agreement attached to it. That merger agreement, like Sun's, contained an unqualified representation by Titan to Lockheed Martin affirming FCPA compliance. But the representation later proved to be untrue.

The SEC warned through a release that the 8-K was a "communication with shareholders" from Titan and that a reasonable investor could have relied on the untrue FCPA representation, resulting in liability for securities law violations. Presumably, that SEC release would have guided Sun's preparation and publication of its Definitive Merger Proxy, including the compliance reps quoted above.

See Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Release No. 51283 / March 1, 2005 Report of Investigation Pursuant to Section 21(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Commission Statement on potential Exchange Act Section 10(b) and Section 14(a) liability here.

Editor's Note: It's not all that clear whether Sun's reps are correct as written. Take a look at the AmLaw Daily's story suggesting Sun may have jumped the gun with its filing. We're waiting for clarification from Sun itself. And so, we imagine, are its shareholders.
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Wednesday
Dec172008

A Spectacular Leap

Bob Beamon's long jump of 29 feet 2½ inches in Mexico City in the 1968 Olympics broke the world record by an astounding 21¾ inches. With that one jump Beamon became the first man to reach both 28 and 29 feet, and the word Beamonesque was born -- meaning a spectacular event. We'd describe Siemens' $800 million settlement on Monday of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations as Beamonesque, considering that it surpassed the existing FCPA settlement record by $755.9 million.

Before Siemens, Baker Hughes' April 2007 payment of $44.1 million (including penalties and disgorgement) was the biggest in an FCPA case. Baker Hughes, we think, won't be sorry to relinquish the top spot on the settlement list since being there gets you mentioned in the press about as often as Madonna.

Among other notable settlements, Willbros paid $32.3 million in May this year and Chevron's violations related to the U.N.'s oil for food program cost it $30 million last year. Titan Corporation held the record after it paid $28.5 million in 2005 for its FCPA settlement. Vetco's resolution cost it $26 million in 2007 and Lockheed paid $24.8 million in 1994, the biggest case of its time. York International spent $22 million last year to end its enforcement action. Statoil was close behind in 2006, paying $21 million. AB Volvo's 2008 case settled for $19.6 million, and ABB's violations cost it $16.4 million in 2004. Schnitzer Steel agreed to pay $15.2 million in 2006 and Flowserve $10.5 million this year.

Bob Beamon's great leap stood as a world record for 23 years and earned him a postage stamp in Burundi (pictured above). We're fairly sure Siemens won't be appearing soon on any postage stamps, but it could hold the FCPA settlement record for a very long time.
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Our thanks to Joe Hixson for helping assemble the settlement data in this post. He's with the strategic communications firm The Abernathy MacGregor Group Inc., which has represented some very well-known companies in connection with FCPA enforcement actions. Despite Joe's help, any mistakes in what's written above are all ours.
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