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Entries in Christian Sapsizian (7)

Thursday
Jun022011

From Costa Rican Jail, Ex Alcatel Boss Supports ICE's 'Victim' Claim

A Costa Rican citizen serving jail time there has said in a sworn statement filed in U.S. federal court that no one at the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad S.A. (ICE) knew about Alcatel's bribery except those directly involved.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May052011

Costa Rican 'Victim' Objects To Alcatel-Lucent Settlement

A government-owned company that awarded Alcatel-Lucent more than $300 in bribe-tainted contracts has asked a federal court in Florida to block Alcatel's FCPA settlement with the U.S. government, saying the terms violate a federal victim's rights law.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Apr282011

Ex Head of State Jailed For Alcatel Bribes

The former president of Costa Rica who took bribes from French telecoms company Alcatel was sentenced to five years in prison this week.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Dec282010

Alcatel-Lucent Settles Bribery Case

Paris-based Alcatel-Lucent S.A. will pay $137 million to the DOJ and SEC for bribing officials in Costa Rica, Honduras, Malaysia, and Taiwan.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
May112010

The Hard Timers

Compliance officers will want to keep a copy of the table below close at hand. What better way to answer those who insist that the FCPA is small potatoes, after all, when you look at the relatively few enforcement actions over the past 33 years.

Here are the 22 men (no women so far), most of them former company executives, who've spent time in prison for FCPA-related convictions. Each name that follows represents a terrible tragedy, often with permanent damage extending to families. As the compiler of the list said: "By my count there have been 187 people charged with violating the FCPA. This list will look a little different at the end of the year."

We'd like to thank the generous individual responsible for this post, but that's not possible. He or she has asked to remain anonymous, making this contribution pro bono publico.

The information is compiled from the Federal Bureau of Prisons' inmate locator. Readers with suggestions and corrections are welcome to let us know.

 

Name

Related Company

Register #

Age Race Sex

Release Date

Location

FERNANDO MAYA BASURTO

ABB Ltd

39135-177

48-White-M

UNKNOWN

HOUSTON FDC

CHARLES PAUL EDWARD JUMET

Ports Engineering Consultants Corporation

75638-083

53-White-M

UNKNOWN

NOT IN BOP CUSTODY

SULEIMAN A NASSAR

Lockheed

45723-019

73-White-M

11/19/1996

RELEASED

DAVID H MEAD

Saybolt

79529-079

72-White-M

7/21/1999

RELEASED

HERBERT STEINDLER

General Electric

02423-061

71-White-M

3/13/2000

RELEASED

HERBERT LAWRENCE TANNENBAUM

Tanner Management Corp

82537-054

85-White-M

4/20/2000

RELEASED

RICHARD G PITCHFORD

Central Asia American Enterprise Fund

26036-016

75-White-M

12/4/2003

RELEASED

ROBERT RICHARD KING

Owl Securities and Investments

14447-045

76-White-M

6/30/2006

RELEASED

STEVEN LYNWOOD HEAD

Titan

95321-198

63-White-M

9/29/2008

RELEASED

YAW OSEI AMOAKO

ITXC Corporation

60267-050

58-Black-M

12/17/2008

RELEASED

PAUL GRAYSON NOVAK

Willbros

43505-279

43-White-M

12/19/2008

RELEASED

ROGER MICHAEL YOUNG

ITXC Corporation

29574-016

49-White-M

4/10/2009

RELEASED

STEVEN JOSEPH OTT

ITXC Corporation

60540-050

50-White-M

6/17/2009

RELEASED

RAMENDRA BASU

World Bank

29254-016

47-White-M

8/7/2009

RELEASED

FAHEEM MOUSA SALAM

 

28567-016

32-White-M

1/7/2010

RELEASED

MISAO HIOKI

Bridgestone

90290-111

56-Asian-M

11/23/2010

LOMPOC USP

DAVID KAY

American Rice

13749-179

58-White-M

1/27/2011

TEXARKANA FCI

JIM BOB BROWN

Willbros

66158-179

48-White-M

1/29/2011

ATLANTA USP

CHRISTIAN SAPSIZIAN

Alcatel SA

78172-004

63-White-M

3/18/2011

NE OHIO CORR CTR CI

JASON EDWARD STEPH

Willbros

36444-177

40-White-M

3/28/2011

EL RENO FCI

DOUGLAS MURPHY

American Rice

13987-179

53-White-M

12/31/2012

EL RENO FCI

SHU QUAN-SHENG

AMAC International

58250-083

69-Asian-M

2/18/2013

LA TUNA FCI

 

Friday
Feb192010

Alcatel-Lucent Headed For Settlement

According to its latest consolidated financial statements, Alcatel-Lucent has reached agreement in principle with the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission to settle Foreign Corrupt Practices Act offenses related to Costa Rica, Taiwan and Kenya. If the settlement goes ahead, the company will pay a $92 million criminal fine (payable over three years) and a $45.4 million in disgorgement to the SEC.

The settlement with the DOJ would be structured similar to Siemens', with the company entering into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement for accounting and internal controls offenses, while three subsidiaries — Alcatel-Lucent France, Alcatel-Lucent Trade and Alcatel Centroamerica — would each plead guilty to violating the FCPA’s antibribery, books and records and internal controls provisions. The DOJ agreement would require appointment of a French compliance monitor (in Siemens' case, the monitor was German).

The Paris-based telecommunications company was formed with the 2006 merger of French-firm Alcatel and the American company Lucent Technologies Inc. Before the merger, Alcatel had American depositary receipts traded on the New York Stock Exchange and Lucent was also listed on the NYSE. The merged company's shares trade on the NYSE under the symbol ALU.

We've written about both companies before.

In September 2008, former Alcatel executive Christian Sapsizian, 62, was sentenced to 30 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and forfeiture of $261,500 for bribing employees of the state-owned telecommunications authority in Costa Rica. He had pleaded guilty in June 2007 to two counts of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Sapsizian, a French citizen, was a 20-year Alcatel employee and served as the company's deputy vice president for Latin America. In August 2001, Alcatel received a $149 million cellular network contract from Costa Rica's El Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE). Sapsizian had promised to pay an ICE board member and other officials up to 2 percent of the value of the contract. Before being fired in 2004, he caused Alcatel to wire $14 million in “commission” payments to a consultant, who then transferred $2.5 million to the ICE official.

Sapsizian admitted to conspiring with Edgar Valverde Acosta, a citizen of Costa Rica who was Alcatel’s senior country officer there, to arrange the bribes. Acosta was indicted with Sapsizian on June 14, 2007. He's an FCPA fugitive, last known address: Costa Rica.

The U.S. indictments of Sapsizian and Acosta resulted from bribery investigations by Costa Rican authorities. In October 2004, Alcatel learned of the investigations. It fired Sapsizian and Acosta and disclosed to U.S. authorities that it had uncovered payments from employees and consultants to government officials, ICE employees, and political parties.

Lucent, meanwhile, settled Foreign Corrupt Practices Act charges in December 2007 with the DOJ and SEC. Its violations occurred before the merger with Alcatel. The settlement included a $1 million criminal fine and $1.5 million in civil penalties. Lucent's offenses involved payment of travel expenses for Chinese government officials from 2000 to 2003. The FCPA includes an affirmative defense that allows payment or reimbursement of expenses of foreign officials that are directly related to “the promotion, demonstration, or explanation of products or services." 15 U.S.C. §§ 78dd-1(c)(2)(A) and 78dd-2(c)(2)(A). Many of Lucent's payments, however, were not directly related to legitimate business purposes and were not recorded accurately in its books and records.

In April 2009, Alcatel-Lucent signed agreements in Washington, D.C. worth $1.7 billion with China Mobile and China Telecom to help the Chinese companies roll out 3G technology.

Here's part of the company's disclosure from its latest Form 10-K:

As previously disclosed in its public filings, Alcatel-Lucent has engaged in settlement discussions with the DOJ and the SEC with regard to the ongoing FCPA investigations. These discussions have resulted in December 2009 in agreements in principle with the staffs of each of the agencies. There can be no assurances, however, that final agreements will be reached with the agencies or accepted in court. If finalized, the agreements would relate to alleged violations of the FCPA involving several countries, including Costa Rica, Taiwan, and Kenya.

Under the agreement in principle with the SEC, Alcatel-Lucent would enter into a consent decree under which Alcatel-Lucent would neither admit nor deny violations of the antibribery, internal controls and books and records provisions of the FCPA and would be enjoined from future violations of U.S. securities laws, pay U.S. $45.4 million in disgorgement of profits and prejudgment interest and agree to a three-year French anticorruption compliance monitor to evaluate in accordance with the provisions of the consent decree (unless any specific provision therein is expressly determined by the French Ministry of Justice to violate French law) the effectiveness of Alcatel-Lucent's internal controls, record-keeping and financial reporting policies and procedures. Under the agreement in principle with the DOJ, Alcatel-Lucent would enter into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement (DPA), charging Alcatel-Lucent with violations of the internal controls and books and records provisions of the FCPA, and Alcatel-Lucent would pay a total criminal fine of U.S. $ 92 million—payable in four installments over the course of three years.

In addition, three Alcatel-Lucent subsidiaries—Alcatel-Lucent France, Alcatel-Lucent Trade and Alcatel Centroamerica—would each plead guilty to violations of the FCPA’s antibribery, books and records and internal accounting controls provisions. The agreement with the DOJ would also contain provisions relating to a three-year French anticorruption compliance monitor. If Alcatel-Lucent fully complies with the terms of the DPA, the DOJ would dismiss the charges upon conclusion of the three-year term.

Tuesday
Sep232008

French Citizen Jailed For FCPA Offenses

Former Alcatel executive Christian Sapsizian, 62, has been sentenced to 30 months in prison, three years of supervised release, and forfeiture of $261,500 for bribing employees of the state-owned telecommunications authority in Costa Rica. Sapsizian had pleaded guilty in June 2007 to two counts of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Under his guilty plea, he faced a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and $330,000 in forfeiture.

Sapsizian, a French citizen, was a 20-year Alcatel employee and served as the company's deputy vice president for Latin America. In August 2001, Alcatel received a $149 million cellular network contract from Costa Rica's El Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE). Sapsizian had promised to pay an ICE board member and other officials up to 2 percent of the value of the contract. Before being fired in 2004, he caused Alcatel to wire $14 million in “commission” payments to a consultant, who then transferred $2.5 million to the ICE official.

Sapsizian admitted to conspiring with Edgar Valverde Acosta, a citizen of Costa Rica who was Alcatel’s senior country officer there, to arrange the bribes. Acosta was indicted with Sapsizian and on June 14, 2007, the federal court in Miami transferred him to fugitive status.

Alcatel learned in October 2004 that Costa Rican authorities were investigating payments from its consultants to government officials, political parties, and officials of ICE. The company's internal investigation led to the firing of employees and consultants who were involved and its self-disclosure to the U.S. Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Until late 2006, when it merged with Lucent, Alcatel was a French company with American depositary receipts traded on the New York Stock Exchange. It's now called Alcatel-Lucent.

The Justice Department said an ongoing investigation is being conducted by the FBI and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. It also said it received help from Costa Rican and French law enforcement authorities.

View the DOJ's September 23, 2008 release here.

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