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Entries in Chevron (22)

Tuesday
Jul082014

Donziger appeals RICO verdict in Chevron case

New York plaintiffs’ lawyer Steven Donziger has appealed a civil racketeering verdict against him growing out of a disputed $9.5 billion environmental award he won against Chevron, Petro Global News said Monday.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
May072014

Chevron suit against Patton Boggs can go ahead, judge says

A federal judge last week struck down Patton Bogg's claims of bad faith against Chevron but let stand counter claims alleging the D.C. law firm joined a fraud and cover up related to a $9.5 billion pollution award in Ecuador, Petro Global News said.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Apr012014

Judge lets Chevron sue Patton Boggs for fraud in Ecuador case

Randy Mastro, Chevron’s outside counselA New York federal judge ruled Monday that Chevron can sue Washington, DC’s Patton Boggs for allegedly committing fraud while trying to enforce a multibillion-dollar judgment for environmental damage in Ecuador.

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Friday
Mar212014

After RICO trial win, Chevron demands $32 million from plaintiffs lawyer Donziger for attorneys fees

Chevron Corporation asked a federal court Tuesday to award it $32 million for attorneys fees it incurred during a successful fraud and racketeering trial against U.S. lawyer Steven Donziger.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Oct212013

Global Contagion Report -- Chevron Indonesia

Country: Indonesia

Individual: Bachtiar Abdul Fatah

Company Involved: Chevron

Industry: Oil and Gas

Enforcement Action: Conviction and Sentencing

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Wednesday
Aug142013

Indonesia arrests top oil regulator

Rudi Rubiandini, the chairman of SKKMigas, was arrested at his home late Tuesday (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)Indonesia‘s Corruption Eradication Agency arrested the head of the country's oil and gas regulator late Tuesday at his home in Jakarta.

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Friday
May312013

Total lands third on the Top 10 disgorgement list

As part of its $398 million settlement Wednesday, Total S.A. agreed with the SEC to disgorge $153 million of profit made from its bribery in Iran. That's the second biggest disgorgement in FCPA history.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Mar212012

Top Ten Disgorgements (March 2012)

Since we first listed the top ten FCPA disgorgements a year ago, two new companies joined the list -- Johnson & Johnson and Magyar Telekom. They replaced GE and Baker Hughes.

Click to read more ...

Friday
Aug272010

Graft Buster Enters French Politics

Eva Joly, a Norwegian-born former French magistrate, is running for the French presidency under the Green Party banner.

She became famous across Europe for being a fearless anti-corruption campaigner, even taking on former minister Bernard Tapie and Crédit Lyonnais bank.

Her best-known case involved French oil giant Elf Aquitaine. She uncovered fraud leading to criminal convictions of Elf’s top two executives and to the resignation of Roland Dumas, president of France’s Constitutional Court. She received death threats during the eight-year investigation.

She moved from Norway to France at 18. After working her way through night law school and then practicing law, in 1990 she became an investigating magistrate in Paris.

She's also worked for the Icelandic government, helping it uncover white collar crime that contributed to the country's financial collapse.

Last year, Joly, 66, was elected as a French member of the European Parliament. Now she wants to run for president of France in the 2012 elections.

She told the France24 news site: “I am going into politics because I recognise the limitations of voluntary action … I have a strong desire to improve relations between the developed and developing world. I want to change power structures within society. I am desperate to see a more just and more united society.

*     *     *

Why say it? It's fashionable these days for critics -- we won't name them -- to say there's no evidence the FCPA has reduced bribery. But saying there's no evidence of crimes not committed isn't exactly, you know, conclusive of anything.

Then again, there's plenty of evidence of less bribery because of the FCPA at companies like Siemens, BAE, Daimler, KBR, ABB, Baker Hughes, Willbros, Chevron, and so on. For us, that's the evidence that counts.

*    *   *

In whose interests? Great post today from Kevin LaCroix at the D&O Diary -- Do Defendant Companies Financially Underperform Following Securities Lawsuit Settlements? 

Monday
Aug022010

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished

While looking at FCPA enforcement data, Bruce Hinchey, left, made a startling and disturbing discovery about the consequences of self reporting.

Here's his story:

* * *

Dear FCPA Blog,

Many question the Department of Justice’s claim that there are tangible benefits to voluntary disclosure of a FCPA violation.

As a part of a yet unpublished paper, I consider the data from 40 FCPA cases from 2002 through 2009 and the differences between bribes paid and penalties levied against companies that do and do not self-disclose.

In the paper, linear regression analysis of the cases reveals a sound statistical relationship between the amounts a company bribes and the corresponding fine it receives. For now, I will focus on the fine-to-bribe ratio companies face for FCPA violations. The fine-to-bribe ratio is calculated by simply dividing the total penalty a company received by the amount it bribed.

Voluntary Disclosures

Within the voluntary disclosure group the fine-to-bribe ratios ranged from encouragingly low (Bristow Group Inc. and Latinode Inc. stand out with a fine-to-bribe ratio of 0 and .89, respectively) to strikingly high (Baker Hughes Inc. and Schnitzer Steel Industries Inc. had fine-to-bribe ratios of 10.73 and 8.46, respectively). On average, this group faced a 4.53 fine-to-bribe ratio. Thus, it appears as though a voluntarily disclosing company might expect a fine of $4.53 for every dollar given as a bribe.

Involuntary Disclosures

The involuntary disclosure group also had surprisingly high ratios (Flowserve Corp. and Akzo-Nobel NV had fine-to-bribe ratios of 17.37 and 13.42, respectively) and low ratios (the Chevron Corp. and El Paso Corp.’s fine-to-bribe ratios were 1.5 and 1.41, respectively). This group, however, faced an average fine-to-bribe ratio of 3.22, suggesting a non-voluntarily disclosing company might expect a fine of only $3.22 per dollar bribed, compared to the voluntary disclosure group’s 4.53. This ratio would be even lower had it included the disproportionately low fine-to-bribe ratios levied in the cases against Siemens AG and KBR, which I dismissed as outliers.

Remaining Questions

Given the bribe-to-fine ratios in the published cases in recent years, the Justice Department appears not to be following up with its promised benefits. The seemingly disproportionate bribe-to-fine ratios outlined above raise questions about whether current FCPA enforcement is fundamentally fair.

Many thanks,

Bruce Hinchey

______________________

Bruce is a lawyer completing an LLM in government procurement law at the George Washington University Law School. His paper, "Punishing the Penitent: Disproportionate Fines in Recent FCPA Enforcements and Suggested Improvements," can be downloaded at SSRN here.

It was generous of Bruce to share his work with us and our readers. Thank you, Bruce, for blowing our mind.

He's currently looking for a position in an FCPA defense and government contracts practice and can be reached at bhinchey@law.gwu.edu